How to Build a Backyard PVC Pipe Lacrosse Goal | Lax Goalie Rat

How to Build a Backyard PVC Pipe Lacrosse Goal

If you’ve got the space in your backyard, building a PVC pipe goal is an awesome project.

Let your goalie get some extra reps with their big brother/sister or simply just work on their positioning in the cage.

I wouldn’t say my house has a huge backyard but it definitely needed a PVC pipe goal so I can demo some different techniques and drills for all you youth goalies out there.

Here is how I purchased the materials and assembled my very own backyard PVC pipe goal.

PVC Pipe Lacrosse Goal Design

I got my design from this video on YouTube:

I started watching that video to learn how to build a PVC pipe goal and left with a Masters in geometry as he gets really in the weeds talking about the angles. I mean the Pythagorean Theorem was mentioned.

Anyways here is the design. The 3 goal posts (top, right, left) are all 6 foot and the two back supporting posts on the ground work out to 4.24 feet. All pipes are joined with 90 degree connectors.

I should mention I’m currently living in Argentina so I converted all the measurements to centimeters because you know, metric system everywhere except USA.

Here PVC pipe connectors come in 45 or 90 degree angles so we’re using 90deg. for this design.

Shopping for Parts

Here is your shopping list for a PVC pipe lacrosse goal:

  • 3 x 6 foot PVC pieces
  • 2 x 4.24 foot PVC pieces
  • 5 x 90 degree angle PVC pipe connectors
  • PVC Pipe glue
  • Lacrosse net

You’ll also need a hacksaw, a pencil and a measuring tape to cut the PVC pipe assuming the hardware store doesn’t do it for you.

You’ll need a total of 26.48 feet of PVC pipe but be careful because if any piece is smaller than what I list above after the cuts are made it will be unusable for this project.

At the hardware store where I went they sold PVC pipe in 4 meter (13.1 feet) lengths. So I got 3.

I actually have no idea if PVC pipe is like this in the US but here in Argentina one end of male and the other end is female.

The 90 degree connectors also have male and female ends.

The only issue is I hade to make cuts in the PVC pipe leaving me with pieces with two male ends. So they also sell this female/female adapter.

So like I said, after purchasing the pipes you’ll want to measure and make your cuts.

PVC Pipe Goal Assembly

After your pipes are cut to the right length, the next step is assembly.

You want to assemble the goal BEFORE locking it in the PVC pipe glue because odds are you’ll have to adjust some of the cuts.

Assembly is pretty easy. Just plug the PVC pipes into the corner pieces. I used the extra adapter where needed.

Looking good. Slight lean forward but once the weight of the net is on there I think it will be fine.

In this design since the top is so heavy it does fall forward on its own. So you’ll notice I’ve placed a brick on the back to weigh it down.

PVC Pipe Goal Measure

Next step is to measure the goal. Remember the lacrosse goal is 6 foot by 6 foot.

It’s difficult to predict how much extra height and width the connectors are going to add so I cut the pipes at 6′, assemble, measure, and then trim down.

My goal was a little taller and a little wider than 6 feet so I made measurements, disassembled and then cut them down.

PVC Pipe Glue

Once you’re confident you’ve got the right setup, it’s time to lock everything in place.

Take your PVC pipe adhesive and generously coat the PVC pipe and the connector.

Reassemble the goal and let that dry for a bit.

Attaching the Net

Now that we have the structure of our lacrosse goal, time to put on the net.

Up until now the cost has been minimal. You can probably get all the PVC materials for something like $30-40.

Lacrosse nets are expensive.

But hey, what are you going to do? I need a net and I need a heavy duty one because yes I plan on absolutely ripping some corners.

You could always check SidelineSwap to see if anyone is selling a used lacrosse net.

Putting the net on is fairly straight forward. I looped every other hole up top and then every 3rd hole on the sides.

Because the base of a regulation lacrosse goal is a lot bigger you’ll end up with a bunch of slack at the bottom / base of the goal.

Once the top and sides are attached to the frame, I pull the net tight towards the back base and attach it with a zip tie. Then when you attach the net to the base you’ll actually doing it like 4 or 5 rows up, not at the bottom of the net.

This removes slack and gives you a nice tight net setup like you see above.

You can see some of the extra slack tucked underneath the base of the goal. You could cut that off but it doesn’t bother me so I’ll just leave it.

The goal is still top heavy where you need to put a brick on the back or else it will fall forward.

Conclusion

There you go. Lacrosse PVC pipe goal.

A simple project you can knockout on a Sunday.

Now its time to start recording some tutorial videos in front of this new net.

Any questions on how to make a PVC pipe goal? Leave me a comment down below. 

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